Division of Crop Production


Major Areas of Research

  • Agronomy
  • Soil science
  • Water management
  • Physiology and biochemistry
  • Post harvest technology
  • Social science

Facilities Avaiable

  • Biochemistry laboratory
  • Soil science laboratory
  • Plant physiology laboratory
  • Post harvest laboratory
  • CHNS analyser
  • Nitrogen analyser
  • Spectrophotometer
  • Texture analyser
  • HPLC
  • GCMS

  • Technology for nursery management was standardized involving soil solarization, seed treatment and shade/agro nets. Solarization of nursery beds by covering with transparent polythene (200 gauge) for 5-6 weeks and seed treatment with Trichoderma viridae (@ 4g/kg seeds) gave good control of diseases. During seedling growth, when temperature is more than 30 °C, covering of seed beds with shade/agro nets (50 or 60 % shade) at 1 m height with suitable support reduces seedling mortality due to heat scorching. Besides, agro nets also help in control of insects, particularly insect vectors that spread viral diseases.
  • The highest fruit yield of tomato cv. Avinash-2 (1222.13 q/ha) and water use efficiency (58.06 q/ha-cm) was recorded with drip irrigation at 100% ET (Evapotranspiration) coupled with black polythene mulch.
  • Furrow irrigated raised bed planting (FIRB) in tomato (Kashi Vishesh) saved 36% water over flat system. This system along with paddy straw mulch is able to save about 49% water with 55% increase in fruit yield over absolute control.
  • In tomato cv. Kashi Vishesh, the maximum WUE (9.42 q/ha-cm) was achieved with alternate furrow irrigation (AFI) + black polythene mulching. Black polythene and transparent polythene saved 33.7% and 20% water, respectively over ‘no mulch’.
  • In okra c.v. Kashi Pragati, the maximum WUE of 602.73 kg/ha-cm was obtained with irrigation at 10 days intervals coupled with pea straw mulching (@7.5 t/ha) About 30% water could be saved in okra during summer with pea straw mulching as compared to unmulched control.
  • In tomato maximum yield (557.30 q/ha) can be obtained in cv. Kashi Vishesh by the application of poultry manure@ 5t/ha + NPK (60:30:40kg/ha).
  • In cowpea, application of FYM @ 10t/ha + NPK (30:30:30 kg/ha) + PSB (seed treatment @ 20g/kg seed) in cv. Kashi Kanchan was observed to produce maximum number of branches/plant and number of fruits per plants and gave higher yield (13.2 t/ha).
  • In bottle gourd cv. Kashi Ganga, the maximum yield (40.7 t/ha)can be achieved with application of vermicompost @ 2.5 t/ha + ½ recommended NPK + micronutrient mixture (ZnSO4 @ 0.3%, Borax @ 0.2 % and ammonium molybdate @ 0.08%).
  • In tomato, maximum yield (52.4 t/ha) and nitrogen use efficiency (0.23 t/kg N) in cv. Kashi Vishesh was achieved by treating seedlings with biofertlizer (Azotobacter @2% solution) + raising them on raised beds + foliar spray of water soluble fertilizers (N:P:K 19:19:19 @ 0.5%) + foliar application of micronutrient mixture (Borax 0.2% and ZnSO4 0.5%) + plastic mulching.
  • In cabbage, maximum yield (64.7 t/ha) and nitrogen use efficiency (0.28 t/kg N) in cv. Rare ball was achieved by treating seedlings with biofertlizer (Azotobacter @2% solution) + raising them on raised beds + foliar spray of water soluble fertilizers (N:P:K 19:19:19 @ 0.5%) + foliar application of micronutrient mixture (Borax 0.2% and ZnSO4 0.5%) + plastic mulching.
  • In cowpea, maximum yield (12.18 t/ha) and nitrogen use efficiency (0.15 t/kg N) in cv. Kashi Kanchan was achieved by seed treatment with biofertlizer (Rhizobium @2% solution) + raising them on ridges + foliar spray of water soluble fertilizers (N:P:K 19:19:19 @ 0.5%) + foliar application of micronutrient mixture (Borax 0.2% and ZnSO4 0.5%) + plastic mulching.
  • Application of poultry manure @ 7.5 t/ha recorded 28-35 % higher yield with 17-25% higher vitamin-C content in cabbage, cauliflower, tomato, okra and cowpea as compared to the inorganic management system receiving 100% recommended dose of NPK through chemical fertilizers.
  • Two foliar sprays of Zn (@200 ppm) or B (@ 5 ppm) at 30 and 45 DAS increased the pod yield by 28% and 23%, respectively in okra cv. Kashi Pragati.
  • In French bean c.v. Swarn Priya, foliar sprays of Zn (50 ppm), Cu (5 ppm) and B (5 ppm) exhibited significantly higher seed yield (20-25 %) over control. A significant increase in Vitamin A and Vitamin C content (25-45%) in French bean pods was achieved with two sprays of these micronutrients.
  • Yield potential up to 114.5 and 363.5 q/ha was demonstrated to be achievable in cowpea and tomato crops, respectively, with zero tillage on permanent ridges and residue retention. The savings in input costs and energy use in cowpea-tomato cropping system were Rs. 18,394/ha/yr and 9626 MJ/ha/yr, respectively with ZT on permanent ridges and residue retention. About 60 L/ha/yr of fuel could also be saved with zero tillage.
  • Variability of some important antioxidants and minerals were analyzed in between and within the crucifer accessions. Total carbohydrate content ranged between 2.54-4.03g/100g, protein from 0.41-3.57 % of fresh weight, fiber content ranged from 0.60 to 3.62 g/100g, Vitamin C content ranged from 22.16-82.14 mg /100g and b-carotene ranged from 1.56 to 9.09 mg/100g fresh weight. In general kale, broccoli and Brussels sprouts ranked high in their antioxidant capacity containing significant amounts of Vitamin C and b-carotene.
  • The process for antioxidant rich green chilli powder was standardized with selection of suitable additives in blanching process followed by osmotic diffusion in salt solution and drying a. The dried and blended green chilli powder can be preserved for 10-12 months at room temp without any significant alteration in vitamin C, green colour and pungency.
  • The technology for the manufacture of ready-to-eat bitter gourd, pointed gourd and ivy gourd chips was standardized by cooking the vegetables in boiling water followed by osmotic diffusion treatment in NaCl solution and drying. The dried vegetables are the fried in refined oil at 160-180oC for 3-5 sec.
  • The process for osmo-air drying of dried bitter gourd, ivy gourd, pointed gourd, cauliflower and broccoli was standardized after blanching treatment in permitted additives to minimize the green color discoloration followed by osmotic diffusion treatment in NaCl solution and drying. The dried vegetables attained good rehydration and sensory properties and remained acceptable for 8-10 months at room temperature.
  • In tomatoes at breaking stage of harvest, extension in shelf life up to 40-50 days was achieved when stored in polypropylene pouches at room temperature. Whereas, shelf life of 30 days in capsicum and 25 days in chillies was achieved when stored in polypropylene pouches under refrigerated conditions (8-10oC).